Canada Modern —
Identity and Website

Project images

Canada Modern — Identity and Website Canada Modern — Identity and Website Canada Modern — Identity and Website Canada Modern — Identity and Website Canada Modern — Identity and Website Canada Modern — Identity and Website Canada Modern — Identity and Website Canada Modern — Identity and Website Canada Modern — Identity and Website Canada Modern — Identity and Website Canada Modern — Identity and Website Canada Modern — Identity and Website

Project information

A devoted archive of modernist artefacts designed during the first golden age of Canadian graphic design (1960—1985). Supporting articles and profiles created with the heroes of the day.

A Believe in® (ad)venture.

In the 1960s, Canada underwent a design renaissance, with European immigrants introducing ideas that were eagerly adopted by Canadian nationals. From this emerged an exciting new national identity and a wealth of remarkable work and events. Canada Modern was conceived and produced by Blair Thomson to preserve and celebrate this important period, and help to educate future generations about its significance.

A product of Blair's abiding passion for the subject, the site was initially launched in early 2018 and will continue to build as new content is digitized and acquired. Many of the leading figures from the period (or their surviving colleagues and relatives) have given their time and resources freely to help build this permanent collection, contributing pieces from their archives that may never have been seen in public for over half a century or more. Supporting articles and profiles add context and depth to the collection.

The identity is sympathetic to the approach and philosophy of the era, but never seeking to overshadow the works being showcased. Colours were sampled from materials in the collection and the typography combines a synergy to the past with the clarity of the digital age. Every decision made with a clear rationale for doing so. A suite of supporting materials have been created to engage with universities, conferences and the greater public, encouraging the collection to be seen as a physical entity rather than merely a digital resource.

Visit the site — Canada Modern